CeNTech R & D


Photonics/Magnonics

Prof. Dr. Sergej Demokritov

The research fields of Group "Nonlinear magnetic Dynamics" of Prof. S.O. Demokritov are spintronics and magnonics in application to the investigation of hybrid magnetic nano-systems. The main issues we are interested in are magnonic nano-optics and the interplay of spin currents and magnetic dynamics. Magnetic nano-systems driven by spin currents demonstrate a variety of exciting physical phenomena including self-generation of coherent microwave radiation, amplification of microwaves and suppression of thermal magnetic noise. With the main goal to implement magnonic nano-devices for transmission and processing of signals, logic operations, and pattern recognition the group develops novel approaches for creation of spin currents and designs media for linear and nonlinear guiding of magnetic signals on the nanoscale.

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Prof. Dr. Sergej Demokritov

Prof. Dr. Wolfram Pernice

Research in the Group "Responsive Nanosystems" of Prof. W. Pernice focusses on the investigation of nanoscale optical components and hybrid photonic devices. With high resolution nanostructuring methods nanophotonic integrated circuits are realized for applications in telecommunications, optical sensing and quantum photonics. With the goal to implement chip-based quantum optics the group develops high performance single photon detection devices and nanoscale single photon sources. In addition, plasmonic nanostructures and optomechanical circuits are developed for studying light-matter interactions on the nanoscale.

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Prof. Dr. Wolfram Pernice

Dr. Cristian A. Strassert

The research group of Dr. C. Strassert developed a new class of trifunctional hybrid nanoparticles that are able to simultaneously target, label and photoinactivate pathogenic, antibiotic-resistant bacteria, using industry-standard dyes and a well-known solid support. Furthermore, the group focuses on the design, synthesis and characterization of electroluminescent metal complexes for Organic Light Emitting Diodes technology (OLEDs). Recently they discovered that it is possible to reach up to 90% photoluminescence quantum yield in gelating nanoassemblies of organometallic compounds by judiciously choosing the substituents of the ancillary ligands.

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Dr. Cristian A. Strassert