CeNTech R & D


Nano-Medicine

Dr. Seda Kehr

The research group Nano-biomaterials of Dr. Nermin Seda Kehr focuses on the syntheses and spatial controlled functionalizations of porous nanoparticles (NPs), preparation of their self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and nanocomposite (NC) hydrogels as 2D and 3D biomaterials for biotechnological applications. We are particularly interested in the synthesis and selective external and internal surface functionalization of silica based porous NPs. These multi-functionalized NPs are used for the preparation of 2D and 3D biomaterials to study cell-materials interactions. Additionally, we utilize multi-functionalized NPs as nanocontaines for drug delivery and specific targeting applications.

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Dr. Seda Kehr

Dr. Kristina Riehemann

The nano-medicine Group of Dr. K. Riehemann at CeNTech, Münster uses nano-materials applicable for medical purposes e.g. during inflammation or, optimized nano-structures that reduce inflammation, for prosthetics. Nano-analytics methods, like Atomic force microscopy (AFM), are used to understand subcellular processes during inflammatory processes and nano-biotechnology manipulates cells via nano-structures on the surface of materials according to medical needs. The group investigates the interaction of nanoparticles/nanostructured surfaces and cells of the immune system. In close cooperation to material science nanoparticles are characterized with regard to there the biomedical risk and benefit.

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Dr. Kristina Riehemann

Dr. Cristian A. Strassert

The research group of Dr. C. Strassert developed a new class of trifunctional hybrid nanoparticles that are able to simultaneously target, label and photoinactivate pathogenic, antibiotic-resistant bacteria, using industry-standard dyes and a well-known solid support. Furthermore, the group focuses on the design, synthesis and characterization of electroluminescent metal complexes for Organic Light Emitting Diodes technology (OLEDs). Recently they discovered that it is possible to reach up to 90% photoluminescence quantum yield in gelating nanoassemblies of organometallic compounds by judiciously choosing the substituents of the ancillary ligands.

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Dr. Cristian A. Strassert